Antenna Guru

RF is not 'black magic' – It's Synthesis, Optimization, Analysis and Realization.

Stewed Pork Roast


1          3 – 4 lb center cut pork roast 3          qts chicken stock
½         cup Cajun seasoning (more or less) 2          cups dark roux
3          cups diced onions ½         cup garlic powder
1 ½      cups diced celery 1          tsp black pepper
1 ½      cups bell pepper 1          tsp cayenne pepper
1          cup dried oregano 1          cup dried sweet basil
½         tsp thyme 1          tsp cumin
1          tsp chili powder ½         tsp cardamom
1          bunch carrots 2          lbs potatoes
  • Rub the roast with Cajun seasoning (Tony Chacheres or equivalent) and refrigerate for at least an hour prior to cooking.
  • Using a large skillet or a griddle, sear the roast on all sides. Remove roast from heat and set aside.
  • Saute the ‘holy trinity‘ (onions, celery, peppers) with the basil and oregano until the onions begin to brown.
  • Transfer the ‘holy trinity’ into a large pot. De-glaze the saute pan with some of the chicken stock and pour the ‘dirty’ liquid, plus the rest of the stock into the large pot.
  • Add the carrots and potatoes to the pot and bring to a boil. Add the rest of the spices and stir well.
  • Use tongs to transfer the roast into the simmering pot, cover and boil for at least an hour until the center temperature of the meat is at least 160 degrees (F).
  • (You can also add other vegetables, such as squash, corn, mushrooms, …whatever you have. Add the tender vegetables late in the process, or else they will get mushy. Ten minutes is long enough to boil squash or mushrooms.)
  • When the roast is done cooking, remove it from the pot and place it on a platter. Skim off some of the spices from the pot and coat the top of the roast with them. Cover the roast with aluminum foil and let it set for a half hour.
  • Add the roux to the pot to make gravy.

They have bred the fat almost completely out of modern pork so that ‘roasting’ a roast makes it come out too dry. This is a great way to keep the meat juicy. You can use a crock pot, too; I would rather wash a big kettle and I like having everything on the stove to make all the transfers easier.

We don’t eat much ‘red’ meat, mostly because it is so much more work than seafood to prepare. This one’s a keeper, though.

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